NuGet, assembly and native versions

nanoFramework C# class libraries are distributed as NuGet packages to be consumed by projects. This has been like this since day one. NuGet packages are practical, easy to distribute, easy to consume, easy to update. But they had a …minor… problem. Actually, make that two… 😉 One was that the dependency between the managed assembly … Continue reading NuGet, assembly and native versions

Deployment image generator

nanoFramework Visual Studio extension (both VS2017 and VS2019 versions) just got a new improvement: the ability to generate a “deployment image”. And what the heck is a “deployment image” you ask? Let me explain with a bit more detail. To run a C# application a nanoDevice must have on its storage (which is a flash … Continue reading Deployment image generator

To deploy, or not to deploy, that’s the question…

nanoFramework class libraries are composed of a managed part (written in C#) and the respective counterpart (written in C/C++) that is part of the firmware image that runs on the target. As part of the usual development cycle there are improvements, bug fixes and changes. Some of those touch only the managed part, others only … Continue reading To deploy, or not to deploy, that’s the question…

Support for Visual Studio 2019: check!

Last week we’ve published nanoFramework extension for Visual Studio 2019. Right on time before the official launch event on April 2, 2019. 😉 Being Visual Studio a corner stone in nanoFramework development experience, we wanted to show not only our commitment to our growing community by enabling them to keep up with Visual Studio release … Continue reading Support for Visual Studio 2019: check!

Interop in .NET nanoFramework

José Simões

Have you ever faced the situation of needing to add support for a specific hardware? Or to perform some computing intensive task that would be more efficiently executed in C/C++ rather than with managed C# code?

This is possible with the support that .NET nanoFramework has to plug “code extensions”. It’s called Interop.

What exactly does this? Allows you to add C/C++ code (any code, really!) along with the correspondent C# API.
The C/C++ code of the Interop library is added to an nanoFramework image along with the rest of the nanoCLR.
As for the C# API: that one is compiled into a nice .NET nanoFramework library that you can reference in Visual Studio, just like you usually do.

The fact that this is treated as an extension of the core is intended and, in fact, very positive and convenient. A couple of reasons:

  • Doesn’t require any changes in the main…

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